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MASS TIMES

WEEKDAY MASS:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday:
7:00 am
Wednesday: 8:15 am and 12:15 pm
Saturday: 8:15 am
 

SUNDAY MASS:

Saturday: 5:00 pm
Sunday: 8:00 am, 10:00 am, 12:00 pm,
5:00 pm (Misa en Español)
 

HOLY DAY MASS:

7:00 am, 9:00 am, 7:00 pm
 

CONFESSION:

Saturdays: 3:30 pm-4:30 pm
 

EUCHARISTIC ADORATION and BENEDICTION:

Fridays: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm in the Chapel
 

DAY-LONG ADORATION

First Friday of each month
from 7:30 am to 5:00 pm
 

CONTACT US:

(707) 447-2354 | FAX: (707) 447-9322
1791 Marshall Road,
Vacaville, CA 95687
 

OFFICE HOURS:

Monday – Friday, 9:00 am-4:00 pm
 

welcome TO GOD’S ONE, HOLY, CATHOLIC AND APOSTOLIC CHURCH!

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“Reflection”
As we enter the second week of Advent, we are invited to reflect on how prepared we are for the Lord’s coming. Are there mountains and other obstacles in our path that block our way to holiness? Are there valleys and deserts that bring us low and leave us weak? We turn to God to receive the grace to overcome our troubles and pitfalls and allow us to ready our hearts for Jesus.

“Good Times Coming

We are in a dark time of the year. The mornings are dark and the evenings darker still. Light is scarce, and we have yet to reach the shortest day of the year. It is within that darkness that we have lit our second Advent candle today. The days may be getting shorter, but our Advent wreath is getting brighter. The brightness of our Advent readings draws us toward the great feast of light, Christmas, the birthday of the one who is the light of the world. With the birth of Jesus, the light of God’s love shines out. In today’s first reading, the prophet Baruch looks forward to a day when ‘God will guide Israel in joy by the light of his glory.’
 
Advent is a hopeful season. Hope is an important virtue, deeper than simple optimism of temperament. We can feel optimistic about all kinds of things, but, strictly speaking, the true object of hope is union with God. We are hopeful God can bring life out of death, light out of darkness. It is above all in Winter that we need hope. And we pray for anyone going through dark days at the present time, for people insecure in their jobs or their health or their home life, and displaced people and refugees, who wait at barbed wire borders, hoping to get to a better life.
 
The second reading (from Philippians) came out of a very dark situation. St Paul. was chained in a Roman prison, probably in Ephesus. And he wasn’t sure of getting out of prison alive. Yet the letter is the most hopeful and joyful of all Paul’s letters. It shows that one can remain hopeful even when things look dark. From his prison cell, Paul is grateful for his friendship with the Philippians and is hopeful for their future. He cheerfully recalls their progress so far as a local church. They were no more perfect than other people, but Paul chooses to celebrate their generosity. He praises them for helping to spread the good news from the days they first heard it.
 
We can be tempted in dark times to look at everything with bleary eyes. Paul bids us to look at life, and, especially, at people with hopeful eyes, even in dark times. To see people through hopeful eyes makes us aware of the good in their lives. Let’s recognize what they have done rather than what they have failed to do. Paul hopes that God who began this good work among them would bring it to completion. He had high ideals about what people could become with God’s help. Let’s see ourselves with hopeful eyes. God’s good work has only begun in us. We are a work in progress God will bring the good work to completion. We just need to co-operate with the working of grace. By the end of our life this work will be complete, and we will have reached ‘the perfect goodness which Jesus Christ produces in us’.

Gospel: Luke(3:1-6)

“Prepare a way for God, through heartfelt repentance

In the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius, when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, and Herod was ruler of Galilee, and his brother Philip ruler of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias ruler of Abilene, during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the desert.
 
He went into all the region around the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah,
“The voice of one crying out in the desert: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth; and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.’”
 

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CATHOLICISM

The Mystical Union of Christ and the Church

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