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 VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

 

MASS TIMES

WEEKDAY MASS:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 7:00 am
Wednesday: 8:15 am and 12:15 pm
Saturday: 8:15 am
 

SUNDAY MASS:

Saturday: 5:00 pm
Sunday: 8:00 am, 10:00 am, 12:00 pm,
5:00 pm (Misa en Español)
 

CONFESSION:

Saturdays: 3:30 pm-4:30 pm
 

EUCHARISTIC ADORATION and BENEDICTION:

Fridays: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm in the Chapel
 

DAY-LONG ADORATION

First Friday of each month
from 7:30 am to 5:00 pm
 

CONTACT US:

(707) 447-2354 | FAX: (707) 447-9322
1791 Marshall Road,
Vacaville, CA 95687
  

OFFICE HOURS:

Monday – Friday, 9:00 am-4:00 pm
 
 
 

welcome TO GOD’S ONE, HOLY, CATHOLIC AND APOSTOLIC CHURCH!

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“Reflection”
 
Today we celebrate Father’s Day, honoring our fathers, grandfathers, and all those who have acted as fathers in our lives. How fortunate are we if we had or have a father who is like the majestic cedar described in the first reading, providing comfort and protection for all those in its care.  Whatever our own circumstances, we can look to God, our Almighty Father, as the ideal of a fostering, loving, forgiving parent.

             “How little things grow

Children are great for asking questions. They ask one question and, having got an answer, they ask another. As they grow into adolescence, they begin to ask more probing questions, wanting answers to almost insoluble questions. In time, they come to realize that some of life’s more profound questions don’t have black-and-white, definitive answers. As adults we often have to reconcile ourselves to living with uncertainty. We find that our searching cannot exhaust the many mysteries of life. But we continue to take delight in fresh discoveries, while coming to terms with ‘not knowing’ as an unavoidable fact of life.
Today Jesus speaks about the mystery of growth. A farmer scatters seed on the good soil of Galilee. Having done the sowing, all he can do is attend to other things, while the seed takes over and does its own work, producing first the shoot, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear, until the crop is ready for harvest. In the parable the farmer does not know how all this happens. Between his actions of sowing the seed and harvesting the crop nature takes over in a way that he does not fully understand. There is a great deal in our world which we do not fully understand, in spite of the great progress over the centuries on all aspects of science. 

There is a reassuring message here for any who are discouraged by the slow progress of goodness in the world. The spreading of God’s reign is ultimately the work of God… and that work is going on even when we do not see it or understand it. We have a part to play in bringing about love and justice among us, just as the farmer has a role to play in the coming of the final harvest. However, that first parable in the gospel warns us against overestimating our role. St Paul expresses this perspective well in his first letter to the Corinthians, ‘Neither the one who plants, nor the one who waters is anything, but only God who gives the growth.’

The second parable in today’s gospel reminds us that God can be at work in surprising ways and places. There is a stark contrast between the tiny mustard seed (the smallest of all the seeds), and the large shrub that grows from it, in whose branches the birds of the air can nest. Insignificant beginnings can lead to a wonderful result. The kingdom of God is like that; it often is expressed initially in what is small and seemingly insignificant. We can feel that our own faith is insignificant, as small as a mustard seed. Jesus assures us that the Spirit is working in and through such faith. Our faith can appear as small as a mustard seed; but such hope is enough for the Lord to work with. Our various efforts can seem to bear very insignificant results. The parable assures us that the final harvest from those efforts will be abundant.

We must learn to be content with the small contribution that we ourselves can make towards a better world. The kingdom of God is being worked out in quiet and humble ways. We need to learn to appreciate little things and small gestures. We may not have to be heroes or martyrs, but we are called to put a little dignity into our own little corner of the world. There are little seeds of the kingdom that all of us can sow, a friendly gesture towards someone in trouble, a welcoming smile for someone who is alone, a sign of closeness for someone in despair, a little ray of joy for a person in distress. God’s reign comes in power through the seemingly insignificant actions of each of one us.

 

Gospel: Mark(4:26-34)

“Jesus ponders the mysterious miracle of growth and fruitfulness
Jesus said to the crowd, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.” He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.” With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

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CATHOLICISM

The Mystical Union of Christ and the Church

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