Events TabPicture1
MassTimesMINISTRIES
NDS TAB
OUTREACH MINISTRY TAB
RCIATAB
REGISTRATION TAB
​​

 

MASS TIMES

WEEKDAY MASS:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday:
7:00 am
Wednesday: 8:15 am and 12:15 pm
Saturday: 8:15 am
 

SUNDAY MASS:

Saturday: 5:00 pm
Sunday: 8:00 am, 10:00 am, 12:00 pm,
5:00 pm (Misa en Español)
 

CONFESSION:

Saturdays: 3:30 pm-4:30 pm
 

EUCHARISTIC ADORATION and BENEDICTION:

Fridays: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm in the Chapel
 

DAY-LONG ADORATION

First Friday of each month
from 7:30 am to 5:00 pm
 

CONTACT US:

(707) 447-2354 | FAX: (707) 447-9322
1791 Marshall Road,
Vacaville, CA 95687
 

OFFICE HOURS:

Monday – Friday, 9:00 am-4:00 pm

welcome TO GOD’S ONE, HOLY, CATHOLIC AND APOSTOLIC CHURCH!

 
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
Gallery
 
“Reflection”
As we gather to celebrate the Eucharist, let us not forget that the word “eucharist” means “thanksgiving.” The Greek word eukharistia is used to describe what Jesus did before sharing his body and blood at the Last Supper. Today, as always, we give thanks to God for all the blessings we have received and continue to receive, especially for Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, whom we receive in a special way today in the Eucharist.

“Freedom and God’s will

Sometimes we pride ourselves in having such a good democratic system, a claim which indeed is debatable. We value individual freedom and liberty, the right to choose and decide for ourselves how to live our lives. But the populace can be swayed by pressure groups and allow hardship and curtailment of liberty to be the lot of migrants and asylum-seekers. And while we do not suffer dictators gladly sometimes we seem to want to dictate to God, make God do things our way, and leave us masters of our own destiny. Some even abandon faith and prayer, because God has not granted their requests. This was the inclination of Naaman the leper, an army commander from Syria, as he bargained with God. Hoping to be cured of leprosy by prophet Elisha, Naaman arrived laden with gifts of silver and gold, to pay for his cure. The prophet did not even come out to meet him, but sent a message telling him to wash seven times in the river Jordan. Naaman was so hurt that he prepared to return to Syria, raging with indignation. Why wash in this particular river, when there were so many bigger and cleaner rivers at home? “Here was I thinking Elisha would cure the leprous part,” he fumed. It was only when his servants pointed out how simple was the prescription that he was persuaded to try it and so was cured. Come to think of it, how often do we behave like Naaman. “Why do I have to go to church, when I can worship God out in the open air?” “Why does God send me the cross of sickness, when I could do so much good if I were healthy?” We even find such attitudes among the apostles. “Why do you not show us the Father?” Philip said to him. Some complained, “He says intolerable things and how could anyone accept it?” and they walked with him no more. This reaction of unbelief is often found. But it stands to Naaman’s credit that he thought again, was cured and then returned to thank Elisha. As Shakespeare wrote in King Lear, “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child.” The Eucharist is a reminder never to forget God’s greatest gift to us, his own Son, our Saviour. If we concentrate too much on asking for things, there is a danger that we may reduce our Mass to the level of magical thinking, a way of turning God to our way of thinking. How much better if we can open our hearts and our lives to whatever God wants for us, which is sure to be the best that can happen to us in the long run. We are meant to pray “thy will be done”, not demand to have our own way. When we need a favour, we must ask for it with prayer and thanksgiving, because God answers prayer, even if not precisely in the way we expect. Ultimately, says Jesus, God grants only what is for our good. We need to thank God from the heart, like Naaman after his cure, or like the leper who was grateful to Jesus. What a pity the other nine did not say a word of thanks for the blessing they received.

Gospel: Luke 17:11-19

” Of the ten lepers cured, only one returned to express thanks

On the way to Jerusalem Jesus was going through the region between Samaria and Galilee. As he entered a village, ten lepers approached him. Keeping their distance, they called out, saying, “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us!” When he saw them, he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went, they were made clean.
Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice. He prostrated himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him. And he was a Samaritan. Then Jesus asked, “Were not ten made clean? But the other nine, where are they? Was none of them found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?” Then he said to him, “Get up and go on your way; your faith has made you well.”
___________________________________________________________________

 

CATHOLICISM

The Mystical Union of Christ and the Church

________________________________________________________